Welcome to Dobos Multimedia...

Dobos Multimedia is my personal web site, a place for my portfolio and contact details. My name is Alex Dobson, and I have been a Web Developer / Web Designer since 2000. If you would like to know more about me, click Alex Dobson or take a look at one of my profiles on the right.

The main purpose of this web site is to document some of the work that I have been involved with before I loose track... so really this site is as much for me as it is for you! However, it is possible that you are looking at this site because I gave you my CV or card, or you are trying to find me... if so 'Welcome' & browse on!


I have created a guided tour, which is a small usability feature you can use instead of the browsing in the traditional sense. Just follow the 'next' links on each page.

 

Profiles...

Alex Dobson's Facebook Profile
Alex Dobson's facebok profile

Alex Dobson's LinkedIn Profile
View Alex Dobson's profile on LinkedIn

Stuff I like...

Below is a widget that I built to read RSS feeds, in this case TED - the title says it all!

These video podcasts capture the most extraordinary presentations delivered from the TED stage.

  • A provocative way to finance the fight against climate change | Michael Metcalfe
    Will we do whatever it takes to fight climate change? Back in 2008, following the global financial crisis, governments across the world adopted a "whatever it takes" commitment to monetary recovery, issuing $250 billion worth of international currency to stem the collapse of the economy. In this delightfully wonky talk, financial expert Michael Metcalfe suggests we can use that very same unconventional monetary tool to fund a global commitment to a green future.
  • Why I put myself in danger to tell the stories of Gaza | Ameera Harouda
    When Ameera Harouda hears the sounds of bombs or shells, she heads straight towards them. "I want to be there first because these stories should be told," says Gaza's first female "fixer," a role that allows her to guide journalists into chaotic, war zone scenarios in her home country, which she still loves despite its terrible situation. Find out what motivates Harouda to give a voice to Gaza's human suffering in this unforgettable talk.
  • Insightful human portraits made from data | R. Luke DuBois
    Artist R. Luke DuBois makes unique portraits of presidents, cities, himself and even Britney Spears using data and personality. In this talk, he shares nine projects -- from maps of the country built using information taken from millions of dating profiles to a gun that fires a blank every time a shooting is reported in New Orleans. His point: the way we use technology reflects on us and our culture, and we reduce others to data points at our own peril.
  • A smart loan for people with no credit history (yet) | Shivani Siroya
    Trust: How do you earn it? Banks use credit scores to determine if you're trustworthy, but there are about 2.5 billion people around the world who don't have one to begin with -- and who can't get a loan to start a business, buy a home or otherwise improve their lives. Hear how TED Fellow Shivani Siroya is unlocking untapped purchasing power in the developing world with InVenture, a start-up that uses mobile data to create a financial identity. "With something as simple as a credit score," says Siroya, "we're giving people the power to build their own futures."
  • Hunting for dinosaurs showed me our place in the universe | Kenneth Lacovara
    What happens when you discover a dinosaur? Paleontologist Kenneth Lacovara details his unearthing of Dreadnoughtus -- a 77-million-year-old sauropod that was as tall as a two-story house and as heavy as a jumbo jet -- and considers how amazingly improbable it is that a tiny mammal living in the cracks of the dinosaur world could evolve into a sentient being capable of understanding these magnificent creatures. Join him in a celebration of the Earth's geological history and contemplate our place in deep time.
  • A taboo-free way to talk about periods | Aditi Gupta
    It's true: talking about menstruation makes many people uncomfortable. And that taboo has consequences: in India, three out of every 10 girls don't even know what menstruation is at the time of their first period, and restrictive customs related to periods inflict psychological damage on young girls. Growing up with this taboo herself, Aditi Gupta knew she wanted to help girls, parents and teachers talk about periods comfortably and without shame. She shares how she did it.
  • We can reprogram life. How to do it wisely | Juan Enriquez
    For four billion years, what lived and died on Earth depended on two principles: natural selection and random mutation. Then humans came along and changed everything — hybridizing plants, breeding animals, altering the environment and even purposefully evolving ourselves. Juan Enriquez provides five guidelines for a future where this ability to program life rapidly accelerates. "This is the single most exciting adventure human beings have been on," Enriquez says. "This is the single greatest superpower humans have ever had."
  • Wisdom from great writers on every year of life | Joshua Prager
    As different as we humans are from one another, we all age along the same great sequence, and the shared patterns of our lives pass into the pages of the books we love. In this moving talk, journalist Joshua Prager explores the stages of life through quotations from Norman Mailer, Joyce Carol Oates, William Trevor and other great writers, set to visualizations by graphic designer Milton Glaser. "Books tell us who we've been, who we are, who we will be, too," Prager says.
  • TED's secret to great public speaking | Chris Anderson
    There's no single formula for a great talk, but there is a secret ingredient that all the best ones have in common. TED Curator Chris Anderson shares this secret -- along with four ways to make it work for you. Do you have what it takes to share an idea worth spreading?
  • The inside story of the Paris climate agreement | Christiana Figueres
    What would you do if your job was to save the planet? When Christiana Figueres was tapped by the UN to lead the Paris climate conference (COP 21) in December 2015, she reacted the way many people would: she thought it would be impossible to bring the leaders of 195 countries into agreement on how to slow climate change. Find out how she turned her skepticism into optimism -- and helped the world achieve the most important climate agreement in history.
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