Welcome to Dobos Multimedia...

Dobos Multimedia is my personal web site, a place for my portfolio and contact details. My name is Alex Dobson, and I have been a Web Developer / Web Designer since 2000. If you would like to know more about me, click Alex Dobson or take a look at one of my profiles on the right.

The main purpose of this web site is to document some of the work that I have been involved with before I loose track... so really this site is as much for me as it is for you! However, it is possible that you are looking at this site because I gave you my CV or card, or you are trying to find me... if so 'Welcome' & browse on!


I have created a guided tour, which is a small usability feature you can use instead of the browsing in the traditional sense. Just follow the 'next' links on each page.

 

Profiles...

Alex Dobson's Facebook Profile
Alex Dobson's facebok profile

Alex Dobson's LinkedIn Profile
View Alex Dobson's profile on LinkedIn

Stuff I like...

Below is a widget that I built to read RSS feeds, in this case TED - the title says it all!

These video podcasts capture the most extraordinary presentations delivered from the TED stage.

  • Yuval Noah Harari: What explains the rise of humans?
    Seventy thousand years ago, our human ancestors were insignificant animals, just minding their own business in a corner of Africa with all the other animals. But now, few would disagree that humans dominate planet Earth; we've spread to every continent, and our actions determine the fate of other animals (and possibly Earth itself). How did we get from there to here? Historian Yuval Noah Harari suggests a surprising reason for the rise of humanity.
  • eL Seed: Street art with a message of hope and peace
    What does this gorgeous street art say? It's Arabic poetry, inspired by bold graffiti and placed where a message of hope and peace can do the most good. In this quietly passionate talk, artist and TED Fellow eL Seed describes his ambition: to create art so beautiful it needs no translation.
  • John Green: The nerd's guide to learning everything online
    Some of us learn best in the classroom, and some of us ... well, we don't. But we still love to learn -- we just need to find the way that works for us. In this charming, personal talk, author John Green shares the community of learning that he found in online video.
  • Alaa Murabit: What my religion really says about women
    Strong faith is a core part of Alaa Murabit's identity -- but when she moved from Canada to Libya as a young woman, she was surprised how the tenets of Islam were used to severely limit women's rights, independence and ability to lead. She wondered: Was this really religious doctrine? With humor, passion and a refreshingly rebellious spirt, she shares how she found examples of female leaders across the history of her faith — and how she speaks up for women using verses from the Koran.
  • Jon Ronson: When online shaming spirals out of control
    Twitter gives a voice to the voiceless, a way to speak up and hit back at perceived injustice. But sometimes, says Jon Ronson, things go too far. In a jaw-dropping story of how one un-funny tweet ruined a woman's life and career, Ronson shows how online commenters can end up behaving like a baying mob -- and says it's time to rethink how we interact online.
  • Marlene Zuk: What we learn from insects’ kinky sex lives
    Marlene Zuk delightedly, determinedly studies insects. In this enlightening, funny talk, she shares just some of the ways that they are truly astonishing -- not least for the creative ways they have sex.
  • Salvatore Iaconesi: What happened when I open-sourced my brain cancer
    When artist Salvatore Iaconesi was diagnosed with brain cancer, he refused to be a passive patient -- which, he points out, means "one who waits." So he hacked his brain scans, posted them online, and invited a global community to pitch in on a "cure." This sometimes meant medical advice, and it sometimes meant art, music, emotional support -- from more than half a million people.
  • Alec Soth + Stacey Baker: This is what enduring love looks like
    Stacey Baker has always been obsessed with how couples meet. When she asked photographer Alec Soth to help her explore this topic, they found themselves at the world’s largest speed-dating event, held in Las Vegas on Valentine’s Day, and at the largest retirement community in Nevada — with Soth taking portraits of pairs in each locale. Between these two extremes, they unwound a beautiful through-line of how a couple goes from meeting to creating a life together. (This talk was part of a TED2015 session curated by Pop-Up Magazine: popupmagazine.com or @popupmag on Twitter.)
  • Aspen Baker: A better way to talk about abortion
    Abortion is extremely common. In America, for example, one in three women will have an abortion in their lifetime, yet the strong emotions sparked by the topic -- and the highly politicized rhetoric around it -- leave little room for thoughtful, open debate. In this personal, thoughtful talk, Aspen Baker makes the case for being neither “pro-life” nor “pro-choice” but rather "pro-voice" -- and for the roles that listening and storytelling can play when it comes to discussing difficult topics.
  • Noy Thrupkaew: Human trafficking is all around you. This is how it works
    Behind the everyday bargains we all love -- the $10 manicure, the unlimited shrimp buffet -- is a hidden world of forced labor to keep those prices at rock bottom. Noy Thrupkaew investigates human trafficking – which flourishes in the US and Europe, as well as developing countries – and shows us the human faces behind the exploited labor that feeds global consumers.
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