Welcome to Dobos Multimedia...

Dobos Multimedia is my personal web site, a place for my portfolio and contact details. My name is Alex Dobson, and I have been a Web Developer / Web Designer since 2000. If you would like to know more about me, click Alex Dobson or take a look at one of my profiles on the right.

The main purpose of this web site is to document some of the work that I have been involved with before I loose track... so really this site is as much for me as it is for you! However, it is possible that you are looking at this site because I gave you my CV or card, or you are trying to find me... if so 'Welcome' & browse on!


I have created a guided tour, which is a small usability feature you can use instead of the browsing in the traditional sense. Just follow the 'next' links on each page.

 

Profiles...

Alex Dobson's Facebook Profile
Alex Dobson's facebok profile

Alex Dobson's LinkedIn Profile
View Alex Dobson's profile on LinkedIn

Stuff I like...

Below is a widget that I built to read RSS feeds, in this case TED - the title says it all!

These video podcasts capture the most extraordinary presentations delivered from the TED stage.

  • Rajiv Maheswaran: The math behind basketball's wildest moves
    Basketball is a fast-moving game of improvisation, contact and, ahem, spatio-temporal pattern recognition. Rajiv Maheswaran and his colleagues are analyzing the movements behind the key plays of the game, to help coaches and players combine intuition with new data. Bonus: What they're learning could help us understand how humans move everywhere.
  • Gayle Tzemach Lemmon: Meet the women fighting on the front lines of an American war
    In 2011, the US Armed Forces still had a ban on women in combat -- but in that year, a Special Operations team of women was sent to Afghanistan to serve on the front lines, to build rapport with locals and try to help bring an end to the war. Reporter Gayle Tzemach Lemmon tells the story of this "band of sisters," an extraordinary group of women warriors who helped break a long-standing barrier to serve.
  • Latif Nasser: The amazing story of the man who gave us modern pain relief
    For the longest time, doctors basically ignored the most basic and frustrating part of being sick -- pain. In this lyrical, informative talk, Latif Nasser tells the extraordinary story of wrestler and doctor John J. Bonica, who persuaded the medical profession to take pain seriously -- and transformed the lives of millions.
  • Jimmy Carter: Why I believe the mistreatment of women is the number one human rights abuse 
    With his signature resolve, former US President Jimmy Carter dives into three unexpected reasons why the mistreatment of women and girls continues in so many manifestations in so many parts of the world, both developed and developing. The final reason he gives? “In general, men don’t give a damn.”
  • Dame Ellen MacArthur: The surprising thing I learned sailing solo around the world
    What do you learn when you sail around the world on your own? When solo sailor Ellen MacArthur circled the globe – carrying everything she needed with her – she came back with new insight into the way the world works, as a place of interlocking cycles and finite resources, where the decisions we make today affect what's left for tomorrow. She proposes a bold new way to see the world's economic systems: not as linear, but as circular, where everything comes around.
  • Chris Urmson: How a driverless car sees the road
    Statistically, the least reliable part of the car is ... the driver. Chris Urmson heads up Google's driverless car program, one of several efforts to remove humans from the driver's seat. He talks about where his program is right now, and shares fascinating footage that shows how the car sees the road and makes autonomous decisions about what to do next.
  • Maryn McKenna: What do we do when antibiotics don’t work any more?
    Penicillin changed everything. Infections that had previously killed were suddenly quickly curable. Yet as Maryn McKenna shares in this sobering talk, we've squandered the advantages afforded us by that and later antibiotics. Drug-resistant bacteria mean we're entering a post-antibiotic world -- and it won't be pretty. There are, however, things we can do ... if we start right now.
  • Chip Kidd: The art of first impressions -- in design and life
    Book designer Chip Kidd knows all too well how often we judge things by first appearances. In this hilarious, fast-paced talk, he explains the two techniques designers use to communicate instantly -- clarity and mystery -- and when, why and how they work. He celebrates beautiful, useful pieces of design, skewers less successful work, and shares the thinking behind some of his own iconic book covers.
  • Roxane Gay: Confessions of a bad feminist
    When writer Roxane Gay dubbed herself a "bad feminist," she was making a joke, acknowledging that she couldn't possibly live up to the demands for perfection of the feminist movement. But she's realized that the joke rang hollow. In a thoughtful and provocative talk, she asks us to embrace all flavors of feminism -- and make the small choices that, en masse, might lead to actual change.
  • Joey Alexander: An 11-year-old prodigy performs old-school jazz
    Raised listening to his dad's old records, Joey Alexander plays a brand of sharp, modern piano jazz that you likely wouldn't expect to hear from a pre-teenager. Listen as the 11-year-old delights the TED crowd with his very special performance of a Thelonious Monk classic.
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